Favorite Things Lately, Volume 9

Eldridge Street Synagogue: Founded in the late 1880s, at the start of European Jewry’s mass immigration to the United States, this synagogue had a thriving congregation for more than half a century. In the 1920s, membership began to dwindle and the building fell into disrepair. After being designated a National Historic Landmark in 1996, it underwent a meticulous renovation, which included a modern artistic reimagining of the focal stained glass window. The sky-blue-and-yellow-star window is striking in person and reason alone to visit the synagogue, but be sure to walk around and take in the rest of the details: the flower-like sconces, the chandelier, the Moorish arches. Stand in the middle and think yourself into another time. The synagogue is now in a bustling section of Chinatown, a reminder of the changing face of the city. (Admission is $12; Mondays, pay what you wish. The quality of the tour on offer depends on the specific guide, but I’d recommended it for those not familiar with Jewish history.)

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Roll-N-Roaster: Maybe I’m on a nostalgia kick, but I’m also in love with the transportive power of this superb Sheepshead Bay roast beef restaurant. Opened in the early 1970s, this place is a master class in the aesthetic of the era–wooden beams, a palette of Brady Bunch-esque citrusy browns, hanging glass light fixutres. It’s Brooklyn in the 20th-century sense: old school and with no tolerance for overreaching modernity. And the food? Crave-worthy. The roast beef on a fresh sesame bun with a ladle of melted cheese is fast food at its finest.

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McNally Jackson Books: Wandering around a bookstore is my favorite lazy-day activity. Visually, there’s something awe-inducing about seeing all those book spines stacked side by side. All that work, all those hours, all those ideas. I’m giddy for both the new authors, who are ready to make their marks on the world, and the old and gone, who enjoy a legacy of literary relevancy. McNally Jackson is one of my favorites. It’s intimate without being confining. It’s just the right size for exploring new releases and tracking down classics. They’ve arranged it in such a way where I want to spend time there, reading the first few pages of every book that catches my eye. I’m sure an architect or designer can help explain the technical whys of this attractive configuration. I just know once I enter, I never want to leave.

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Escaping the city: On the plane ride to Los Angeles over Memorial Day weekend, I watched the local New York news, which featured Mayor Bill de Blasio at a press conference sternly warning New Yorkers to stay indoors as a spate of potentially record-breaking cold approached. I felt as though I had boarded the very last plane out of the city before a zombie horde descended. It was a harrowing escape. In LA that weekend, there was a blessed heatwave–temps climbed into the high 80s. I’m not sure I’m ready to decamp for the West Coast, but boy is it nice to get away from the cold for a weekend. We New Yorkers pride ourselves on our grit, but winter can take a psychological toll. Just one weekend away made me feel as though I can survive the wind and the freezing rain (way worse than snow) through the next two months.

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Venice Canals in the neighborhood of Venice in Los Angeles

 

 

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